Fractal

INTERIOR DESIGN AS A FRACTAL – SIMILAR YET RARE

The term “fractal” was first used by mathematician Benoît Mandelbrot in 1975. The image above is his breakthrough and well recognized example of a fractal.
It is a repeating phenomenon in nature, where there is self-similarity yet uniqueness. There is a repetitious quality and it can also feel geometric. And it is, in my opinion, always beautiful. Coastlines are fractals. Trees are fractals. Mountains are fractals. MC Escher is fractal like. Snowflakes are fractals.

I see interior design, as a concept, to be fractal-like. We need a chair, a table, a bed. That is the similarity; and yet an interior designer will give you the necessities of life in a rare and unique way. An interior designer will create an environment that never existed before and that is yours and yours alone. It can change the way you live your life or reaffirm and reconfigure the habits that work for you.

THIS IS INTERIOR DESIGN – MAGICAL AND FAMILIAR

It is completely unique. It is from the mind and the eyes, the soul and imagination. It emerges from the collaboration of this: a wish and a desire on the client’s part; and comes out of an artistic formulation, on the designer’s part. This is backed up by tremendous skill, experience and most importantly, artistry. It is not quantifiable. It is mysterious. It is often unexpected. It can be exhilarating. It can feel very familiar and correct. It is a process that needs breathing room. It is tailor made and bespoke. It can feel challenging, yet necessary. It is life changing – always. It is present everywhere you look. It is truly invented and is site and client specific. It is one of a kind. Your neighbors will never have it. It starts and stops with you.

And yet…..it is a room, a chair, a sofa, a table, a bed, a window covering. Familiar. Functional. Unique. Wondrous. Colorful. Soothing. Soft. Textured.
Yours, and yours alone.

3 thoughts on “INTERIOR DESIGN AS A FRACTAL – SIMILAR YET RARE

  1. Chuck

    Well, that is an interesting applicattion, neatly conceived — I know a little more now than I did before — thank you.

    Reply
  2. Martin Sarna

    This notion of fractal as an aspect of design, repetition as an aspect of design is something that keeps coming back for me as a designer. There’s something attractive in repetition. I think successful brick-and-mortar stores capitalize on this phenomenon. You can see it in your portfolio – the shelves in the white kitchen for example – the repetition of the hand-made pottery and the “coastline” of the un-milled edges of the shelves. My eye is attracted over and over again.

    Thanks for the article!

    Reply
  3. MarciaB1 Post author

    Martin and Dr. K.: Thanks for this input…yes, not only is the concept fascinating, but they are so darn beautiful!!!

    Reply

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